Larry Bradley’s Ezine #362 What Are the Lessons Learned from the 2016 Presidential Primaries?

Weekly Ezine #362

What Is the Best Political Commentary You’ve Seen Lately?
What Are the Lessons Learned from the Recently Concluded 2016 Primaries?

Notice: The thoughts offered in this Ezine are not intended to either support or oppose any individual candidate for the 2016 election. The thoughts are, instead, (as always) intended to demonstrate the inadequacy of our current election processes and offer solutions to make those processes better.

What Is the Best Political Commentary You’ve Seen Lately?

Today I’m going to show you some of the best things I’ve come across lately and tell you why I think they’re good. I hope you’ll point them out to your friends and neighbors and get them involved in Election Reform, too.

There is a feeling among both Progressives and Conservatives that the candidate their side presumes they will nominate will be unable to carry them to victory. Too bad our Election Reform rules aren’t in effect. They might have a better chance to get the candidate they prefer onto the General Election ballot.

Here’s an article with that theme for Clinton.
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2016/05/17/establishment-democrats-and-next-march-folly

And here’s one for Trump by Thomas Sowell.

Grim Choices

And here’s another one from The Resurgent.

Wanted: One Brave Trump Endorser

On the other hand, there are progressives who feel, regardless of the nominee, the internal war among Republicans means Democrats are highly likely to win. I’m showing you this article because I think it accurately depicts the main factions of the Republican Party and their internal conflict. If we had the Election Reforms we advocate, then those three factions could better find expression. They could each have their own party they could take to the General Election and see which of them has the most appeal to voters. Or they might be able to reconcile among themselves. As it is, they fight with one another over which one of them will control the one party available to them. This is a scholarly work, but highly readable. I strongly recommend it.

http://www.democracycorps.com/Republican-Party-Project/the-gop-crash-and-the-historic-moment-for-progressives/

Both conservative and liberals writers are recognizing the need for elements of the Republicans to form a competitive third party. Here are two examples.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-party-of-lincoln-is-dying/2016/06/09/e669380a-2e6b-11e6-9de3-6e6e7a14000c_story.html?hpid=hp_no-name_opinion-card-e%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

Dump the G.O.P. for a Grand New Party – The New York Times

We don’t like the “Top Two” Primary Election method. Like it or not, people don’t participate in Primary elections. They consider the General Election as the one they should show up for. As a result, voters are being surprised to find out their choice is often two members of the same party. The choice, therefore, is very narrow. That’s why we like using Instant Runoff Voting to allow each party to determine a majority winner to go forward into the General Election. There are other problems, too, as described in this article.http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-top-two-primary-california-results-20160609-snap-story.html

As it stands right now, the reality is Conservatives face an uphill battle with the Electoral College in winning the Presidency. If they would embrace our approach, then they would have a better chance. To free up the potential electors in states like California, they need to let go of the potential progressive electors in the Plains States and the South. This article explains why this is so.http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/political-animal-a/2016_06/the_electoral_college_will_be060733.php

Koch Industries and the Koch Brothers have a strong reputation for supporting Conservatives and their causes. Many surprised, therefore, at a communication that seemed to advocate a more centrist approach. Read it for yourself and form your own opinion.

http://www.kochind.com/takingastand/

I’ll have some more of these next week.

What Are the Lessons Learned from the Recently Concluded 2016 Presidential Primaries?

We think the recently concluded 2016 Primaries prove our points that we need Election Reform. Government is a business we run for our mutual benefit and we need to upgrade our hiring practices. Specifically, we need to insure uniformity and consistency in how the parties nominate their candidate. Plus, we need to insure more Parties will be competitive and that the parties that do compete nominate majority, not plurality, winners.

For their part, voters need to realize they need to participate in Primary Elections as much as General Elections. We can stimulate participation by giving people more choices in parties.

Our opinion is we need to do away with Caucuses in favor of Primaries. We further think those Primaries should be conducted with Instant Runoff/Ranked Choice Voting. Balloting should determine the top 3 finishers in each state and carried out to know who is the true first, second and third choice of each party in each state.

The contest between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders was a two person race. Determining the winner was easy in those circumstances. If the Democrats were using our system, then they should have no need of their super delegate firewall. They should be able, therefore, to do away with that system.

Republicans are, of course, more complicated. Looking at the results from Real Clear Politics as of June 17, 2016, we find this. RealClearPolitics – 2016 Republican Popular Vote

Trump’s top three opponents (Cruz, Rubio and Kasich) have 15,284,153 votes after June 7. Trump has 13,300,472. In addition, Trump lost three states that held caucuses instead of primaries (RCP doesn’t offer vote totals for those states). Because the election system being used didn’t have the ability to demand a majority winner, Trump is the plurality winner of the Republican nomination. Trump got 46.53 percent of the vote, and even that number is high because it doesn’t count votes for the other 13 primary opponents. He is not a majority winner.

To say this in another way, the majority of Republican voters wanted someone else other than Trump to be the Republican nominee. If our voting system had been in place, would Trump have been validated as the majority winner or exposed as the leader of a motivated minority within the party? We don’t know and we never will. But wouldn’t it be better to go into the General Election with that question settled?

We think so and we’re going to continue working towards being able to either validate or expose a candidate the next time we have a Presidential election. We hope you will help us accomplish that.

See you next time.

Larry

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